This week I had the opportunity to attend An Event Apart, a top-level design conference for people who work on the web. The founders are two people I still look up to after almost 20 years in the business, Jeffrey Zeldman and Eric Meyer. The speakers talked on a wide range of topics. Zeldman did the keynote, which was an overview of and advice about working in the business. There were speakers on accessibility, site testing, new tools and techniques, and design philosophies. (It’s somewhat heartening to see that nobody has yet been able to figure out how to move away from the 3-designs-5-sizes-and-a-million-comps model two years after I left the biz).

Monday night we were treated to craft beer at Caboose, a new microbrewery featuring the former brewmaster from Heavy Seas, courtesy of Facebook. Somewhat apprehensive about mingling, I drove to the venue and found my way inside, and after dropping my name in a hat and grabbing a beer (a delicious IPA), I found some folks to talk to and wound up having a very good time. Here’s to getting out of the comfort zone. And it just so happened that I won my very first door prize after 20 years: a set of very nice brush pens, a calligraphy set, and a book.

I told Jen it was the kind of focused experience I really could have used in 2011 or so to re-energize; One speaker alone shared knowledge about current features of HTML5 to alter the way I approach design and building, and another shared 5 new tools for building and testing I might never have known about. Overall, there was enough knowledge to make the conference more than worthwhile even though I’m not directly involved in the business anymore; my job demands that I stay current, and this was a good way to check back in.

I’m about 4 days behind at work (a combination of the conference and one of my designers being on vacation) so it’s hard not to feel some guilt for going, but I’m very grateful for the experience, and conferences like this are something I’ll be pushing for in future years for my staff and I.

Date posted: August 12, 2015 | Filed under art/design, geek, WRI | Leave a Comment »

Annoyance is digging through the bones of a website I built in 2009 and trying to remember how I put it all together when GoDaddy wouldn’t let me update my FTP access, I realized my CSS wasn’t written as well as I thought it was, and I suddenly remembered I built the gallery on the homepage in a Flash application.

Date posted: July 6, 2015 | Filed under art/design, geek | Leave a Comment »

After reading Star Blazers Got Me Through The Shittiest Year Of My Childhood, I got totally nostalgic, not because I shared the author’s experiences (that came a few years later) but because I LOVED THAT SHOW. Broadcast from the mighty Channel 29 somewhere near Philly, I watched it religiously every day at 3PM. It was the center of the Venn diagram of awesome: Space, battleships, serial drama. I spent 3rd grade through 5th grade trying to construct the Yamato out of LEGOs. It doesn’t hold up today (in fact, it moves rather slowly) but sure takes me back.

Date posted: March 22, 2015 | Filed under geek, shortlinks | Leave a Comment »

After sixteen years, Matt Haughey steps back from Metafilter. It’s one of the original content aggregators from Back In The Day, and though I don’t visit or participate as much as I used to, it’s still a valuable go-to site for interesting stuff. Many have learned from how Haughey developed his community, which has always been a model of polite, informative, inspirational, and human discourse. Also, site finances have improved, meaning it’s not going anywhere. Good news all the way around.

Date posted: March 5, 2015 | Filed under geek, shortlinks | Leave a Comment »

How did I not know about this before? LEGO offers free Digital Designer Virtual Building Software. I’ll definitely be grabbing this tonight.

Date posted: February 18, 2015 | Filed under geek, shortlinks | Leave a Comment »

Jen and I ventured out to the AT&T store today to have our individual plans combined into one family plan. Some back of the envelope math revealed that we’ve been paying too much individually when we could combine our bill and get a decent discount. The representative at the store suffered from an annoying speech impediment, so understanding what she was telling us was difficult at least. What we saw on the initial bill changes drastically when the phone company adds all of their taxes and fees and charges and double-secret fines, so our takeaway is that we might save some money, but we might not save a whole lot. It remains to be seen.

While we were there I pulled the trigger on a new 64GB iPhone 6. AT&T has three different ways to buy a phone: the standard subsidy model, the buy-it-outright model, and something they call AT&T Next, which is supposed to be geared towards a two-year upgrade plan, but seemed like bullshit to me. The rep couldn’t explain it well enough for me to understand, so I opted for the subsidy. Of course, they didn’t have a phone for me to take home, so I’ve got to wait until the middle of this week to have it delivered. In the meantime I’m going to have Amazon send me a case, because I’ve heard they’re very easy to drop on their own. Then my trusty, slow 4s will be unlocked and sold on Craigslist, where it looks like I can get anywhere from $125-175 for it. It pays to take care of your equipment.


I sat down with my UMBC advisor on Saturday and went over the synopsis of the class, which seems pretty cut and dry. I’m still a wee bit nervous but I think it’s going to be good. My one worry is the amount of time I’ll need to spend on the road, which is going to take me away from the office at a very busy time. We’ve been going nonstop since last summer, and it’s going to take a lot of work to keep on top of everything.

Meanwhile, I’ve got to brush up on some reading and find some bits of inspiration to offer the class. The heavy hitters will be

Thinking With Type, Ellon Lupton
Designing With Type, James Craig
Canon, Massimo Vignelli

There are many more I want to add here; I need to spend some time going through our library and pick out some other heroes.


Peer Pressure got run up for the first time in two weeks on Saturday, and I took her downtown and back (a short trip). My intention has been to get out into the garage and get some work done on her, but it’s just been too goddamn cold.


I brewed a batch of Conundrum Session IPA last night, which went smooth and easy, up until the point I ran out of ice. I made up the rest of the water amount with our Brita pitcher and set it out on the back porch to cool down for an hour, which did the job pretty well. This batch has 3 oz. of hops, which means the bottom 2″ of the fermenter is nothing but sludge. Hopefully the yeast will kick in tonight and I’ll get a replacement for my current keg going.The Irish Stout hasn’t moved since I brewed it in November, so I’ll transfer that to the secondary this afternoon and clean up the pail. And I think I’ll buy a Hefeweizen kit this week and get that one started so that the kegs are full and fresh when the weather starts warming up.

Date posted: January 19, 2015 | Filed under art/design, brewing, geek | Leave a Comment »

Linda, this one is for you:

Free Han Solo in Carbonite Replica, from Craigslist.

Screen Shot 2015-01-15 at 12.57.34 PM

Date posted: January 15, 2015 | Filed under geek, humor | 1 Comment »

File this under things to do when I’ve got some spare time: Computerworld has a handy article for Removing your personal info from data brokers. Looks like some time and effort is needed, but that’s to be expected.

Date posted: November 30, 2014 | Filed under geek, shortlinks | Leave a Comment »

From the Wirecutter/Sweethome: Helpful Gear for Any Emergency. I found a nice alternative to the $100 tactical flashlight I was recommended, as well as a highly-ranked first aid kit to replace the janky one I’ve had since 2000.

Date posted: November 18, 2014 | Filed under geek, shortlinks | Leave a Comment »

No blocking. If a consumer requests access to a website or service, and the content is legal, your ISP should not be permitted to block it.

No throttling. Nor should ISPs be able to intentionally slow down some content or speed up others — through a process often called “throttling” — based on the type of service or your ISP’s preferences.

Increased transparency. The connection between consumers and ISPs — the so-called “last mile” — is not the only place some sites might get special treatment.

No paid prioritization. Simply put: No service should be stuck in a “slow lane” because it does not pay a fee.

I’m shocked it’s taken this long to state these ideas so clearly, but YES.

via Net Neutrality: President Obama’s Plan for a Free and Open Internet.

Date posted: November 11, 2014 | Filed under geek, shortlinks | Leave a Comment »